Lined sea anemones off Cape Ann by Alex Shure. http://www.shureunderwater.com/
Lined sea anemones off Cape Ann by Alex Shure. http://www.shureunderwater.com/

A charming nightmare? With the lined sea anemone perspective matters.

Categories: Creature Features

Look at this tiny wonderland of delicate, star-shaped, fair-haired anemones – benignly filtering food from the water and setting a lovely ocean ambiance. They could be little whisks that a mermaid might use to make a soufflé. Peaceful, right? Wrong. These dudes are remorseless, parasitic death-bringers who drill into their hosts and eat all their food. Which makes me love them a lot, really.

These lined sea anemones (Edwardsiella lineata) spend part of their lives anchored to the bottom of the ocean, doing what most anemones do, sitting around and eating what the current brings them. Before that, however, when they are but wee larvae, they go on a search-and-destroy rampage of their favorite host, a ctenophore known as the sea walnut, or warty comb jelly. We have lots of ctenophores in New England – you can see them in action in this short video by Alex Shure. Ctenophores may seem pretty hardy in this big swarm, but they are no match for the larval lined sea anemone.

 

Jelly Attack! from Green Diver on Vimeo.

It’s not just what this tiny assassin does, it’s how. Mayhem is a polite word for it. As Casey Diederich, my favorite marine biologist for fact-checking blogs about demented goings-on in the ocean, points out:

“The parasitic larva kind of hangs out in/near the pharynx, part of the digestive cavity of the ctenophore, to steal its food. This means that it must have some way to evade digestion by the ctenophore. If you could evade digestion, why not just enter through the ctenophores mouth? Apparently, the parasitic larva burrows through the outside of the ctenophore, then migrates through the ctenophore’s mesoglea (the “jelly” found in  jellyfish, ctenophores, and other kinds of marine invertebrates), and canal system until it gets to the ctenophore’s gut/pharynx. WHAT??? Nature is a crazy motha.”

And, yes, “crazy motha” is a technical marine biology term.

This is probably not much fun for the ctenophore, which can play the unwilling host to several of these baby anemones at a time, but it’s not all bad news, depending on your perspective.

First of all, the parasitic infection prevents the comb jelly from thriving, and thus reduces its population over time. Ctenophores eat zooplankton, including tiny juvenile fish, like cod and flounder. So it’s possible that the parasitic action of the anemone is helping more of these little fish not get eaten and make it to adulthood. More food for us! In some places over half the local comb jellies are infected with the parasitic anemone.

Secondly – in the northeastern Atlantic, off the coast of Europe, these comb jellies are invasive, and really taking a toll on the native wildlife, so the lined anemones might be preventing even worse devastation to the fisheries in that neck of the ocean.

So, the anemones are the good guys? Well, hold on. The larval form of the lined anemone has been implicated as one of the animals that can cause the annoying “sea-bather’s eruption” – an itchy rash you get sometimes after you swim in the ocean. Also, given how successful they are at life in general, there is concern that the lined anemones themselves might become an invasive nuisance in the northeastern Atlantic.

I guess there are no easy conclusions to draw here. Still, I think it’s safe to say that if these types of animals had blood, the lined anemone’s would be cold. One cold-blooded, crazy motha.

Brian Skerry photographs farm-raised carp going to market in Wujin China while on assignment for National Geographic.
Brian Skerry photographs farm-raised carp going to market in Wujin China while on assignment for National Geographic.

Brian Skerry Joins Us at the Boston Sea Rovers’ Dive Show and You Should Too!

We are so excited to be at the Boston Sea Rovers’ dive show again this year as an exhibitor, and are thrilled to announce that we will be hosting a panel discussion on Saturday, March 8th with world-renowned underwater photographer and Sea Rover Brian Skerry, eminent marine scientist and Professor of Biology at Boston University Les Kaufman, and Conservation Law Foundation’s VP and Ocean Program Director Priscilla Brooks!

Details:

  • The Boston Sea Rovers’ show is March 7th – 9th at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Danvers, MA. All the information you need to register and attend is on the Sea Rovers’ website.
  • Our presentation and panel discussion will be on Saturday, March 8th at 2 pm. The location within the hotel will be announced at the day of the presentation.

 

Brian Skerry will be showing his awe-inspiring photographs of Cashes Ledge – a New England undersea treasure in need of protection. Skerry and CLF are working to document and protect this special place. Come hear why Skerry says diving on Cashes Ledge is every bit as thrilling, surprising, and beautiful as anywhere else he’s been. He will give a short talk, featuring his original photography, about what he’s seen in the kelp forest on Cashes Ledge and why he is motivated to help keep it thriving. After the talk, there will be a panel discussion with Skerry, Witman, and Brooks.

We will also have a booth in the exhibit hall where you can come by and chat, learn more about Cashes Ledge, and help us with our work to protect this special place. We hope to see you there!

Originally published on February 6th.

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Untangling our Ocean with Regional Ocean Planning

Categories: CLF Scoop

Quick – who is in charge of the ocean? Good luck answering that; ocean resources are currently managed by more than 20 federal agencies and administered through a web of more than 140 different and often conflicting laws and regulations. This results in such problems as:

  • Poor communication and coordination about ocean use decisions;
  • Slow, reactive management and decisions that drag on unnecessarily to delay or prevent good projects from moving forward;
  • Exclusion from the process – not all ocean users feel like they have a say in decisions;
  • Difficulty sharing information about uses – it’s hard to make sound decisions without having all the facts in one place.

 

Check out the short video above – our concerned octopus has a great idea for helping to change this: regional ocean planning.

Happily, New England is leading the charge in regional ocean planning, a process that brings together all ocean users – from fishermen to whale watchers, from beachgoers to renewable energy developers, to help us figure out how to share the ocean sustainably and maintain the benefits these resources provide for us all.

To learn more please visit Conservation Law Foundation’s regional ocean planning page, where we have podcasts, fact sheets, and updates on New England’s very active ocean planning process.

 

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Wishing you a Fin-tastic 2014!

Categories: Creature Features

Thank you so much for joining us on our New England Ocean Odyssey. We hope you stick around for another year of inspiring photography, heartfelt ocean conservation stories, and good clean shark fun! Happy New Year!

Thanks to Michel Labrecque for this photo contest winning blue shark image - it was reallly fun to dress up.

OnaBoat!
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A Boatful of Thankful – Mantis shrimp, Greenland Sharks, and Kids who Love the Ocean

As we approach our national day of gratitude and binge eating, I wanted to say a big heartfelt “thank you” to my muses, the ocean and the people who geek out on it. Here, in no particular order, are just some of the things in and around the sea that I am truly thankful for, and that make the ocean beat the most interesting one on the planet.

 

  • Mantis shrimp: “One of the most creatively violent animals on the planet.” If you haven’t been introduced to these little guys, or to The Oatmeal cartoon about them - now is the time.

 

  • Greenland sharks or, as they are affectionately known, “Canada’s crocodile.” Slow, small-brained, and often blind from eyeball parasites – they still manage to eat large, fast mammals. In fact, one of them took Greenland sharking to a new level recently by taking on a huge hunk of moose meat in Newfoundland. It did not go well, but fortunately some folks were there to help the shark out of its jam when the moose got stuck.  So, I’m thankful for Greenland sharks and for Newfoundlanders cause DANG that is a uniquely Canadian and impressive feat – yanking a huge hunk of moose hide out of a beached shark. A tip of the hat to you all.

 

  • Squid, cuttlefish, octopi – masters of camouflage and the creatures that make me ponder what evolution has in store for humans. If these guys figure out how to take to land I’m not sure we stand much of a chance. I know other people are worried too – because our SciFi aliens often resemble cephalopods.

 

 

 

  • Cashes Ledge. There is a place in New England that looks like a NorCal giant kelp forest, full of all the best kinds of things in the sea (including wolffish). Help us protect it!

 

  • Surfing. If you surf, you know. If you don’t, I can’t explain it without sounding like a total, well, like this guy. Just go try it. And, while we’re on the subject of surfing:

 

  • Great white sharks. They keep us on our toes. (Literally – I would rather be riding a wave then dangling my shark-bait feet in the water off my board). They also inspire awe and wonder, and really funny memes.

 

 

  • My family. They let me tell all these fantastic tales around the dinner table, help me pull out the juiciest details, and give me ideas for stories I never thought of. My kids can now beat most grownups at “ocean trivia.” Proud mom.

 

 

Mahalo to you all!