"One of the most beautiful deep-sea corals, iridogorgia (a type of octocoral), creates large spirals as it grows. This coral was fairly common during our dives on the New England Seamounts. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts."
"One of the most beautiful deep-sea corals, iridogorgia (a type of octocoral), creates large spirals as it grows. This coral was fairly common during our dives on the New England Seamounts. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts."

Dive Deep Down with NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer

Categories: Creature Features

Are you interested in the kind of creatures that lurk in the dark depths of our New England waters? You can now explore the U.S. Atlantic coast deep-sea ecosystem for yourself!

NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer just wrapped up its 52-day expedition during which a team of scientists collected data on Atlantic submarine canyons and the New England Seamount chain, vastly unexplored areas of our ocean. The expedition consisted of three legs: Leg 1 focused on collecting data over unmapped areas of the New England Seamount Chain, and Legs 2 and 3 used the remotely operated Deep Discoverer to collect baseline data throughout the region.

Atlantic submarine canyons are found between Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and the Gulf of Maine. They are known for their great marine biodiversity and range of critical habitats that connect the outer continental shelf with the deep sea. The New England Seamount Chain is a collection of extinct underwater volcanoes found about 700 miles east of the Northeast U.S. continental shelf. The geological diversity of the chain also gives rise to hotspots of marine biological activity.

Expedition Manager, Brian Kennedy reminds us that “despite the role that oceans play in supporting our well-being, 95% of the ocean remains unexplored. Increasing baseline knowledge of ocean habitats is critical to the conservation and preservation of these remarkable ecosystems.” The data collected from this, and other NOAA expeditions, is invaluable to our nation’s resource managers.

Beautiful photos and spectacular videos of corals, eels, and more are now available! You can find more information and learn about what expeditions NOAA has planned for 2015 here!

A Paramuricea coral in Nygren Canyon, 165 nautical miles southeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Image via NOAA/Okeanos Explorer
A Paramuricea coral in Nygren Canyon, 165 nautical miles southeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Image via NOAA/Okeanos Explorer

New England’s Corals

When most of us think of coral, we picture a scene not unlike that found in Pixar’s Finding Nemo: a vast multicolored reef in the warm shallow waters of the tropics, inhabited by a multitude of equally colorful fish. But did you know that many intricate and colorful species of coral can be found right here in our own New England waters? Growing along the ridges of underwater canyons and seamounts off the Atlantic coast, the New England version of a tropical reef plays host to our own aquatic flora and fauna, more suited to the chilly waters of the northwest Atlantic.

Though they resemble undersea plants, corals are in fact colonies of tiny, soft-bodied invertebrates whose secreted exoskeletons form, over time, the large and intricate structures that we recognize as coral. In the warm waters of the tropics, groups of these exoskeletoned colonies form extensive reefs in the clear, shallow waters close to the shore.

Though snorkelers may appreciate the clear waters of the tropics, the water is so clear in these areas because it contains few nutrients or plankton. Very little mixing of the water column occurs in these uniformly warm waters, so nutrients remain trapped on the bottom of the sea, preventing the multiplication of plankton, and leaving the water empty of food. As a result, tropical corals get their nutrients through a symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic algae, which grows inside the coral and lends it energy from the sun.  Large animals like whales, however, are unable to sustain themselves by hosting algae. Instead, whales like humpbacks and right whales breed in tropical waters but return to New England to feed in the summer. The constantly mixing warm and cold waters of New England bring nutrients to the surface, encouraging plankton growth, and are thus a veritable soup of life. New England corals enjoy this soup just as much as the whales do, and most of them filter feed instead of relying on algae to do the work for them.

A striking purple coral, Clavularia sp., seen in Nygren Canyon. Image via NOAA/Okeanos Explorer

A striking purple coral, Clavularia sp., seen in Nygren Canyon. Image via NOAA/Okeanos Explorer

New England corals live not in the near-shore shallows but along underwater canyons and seamounts. Last summer, NOAA’s Okeanos mission documented some of the wide array of marine life in the Northeast’s canyons, including Oceanographer Canyon, a deep underwater channel that cuts into the southern edge of Georges Bank. You can see images and video from the mission here. The seamounts are part of the New England Seamount Chain and often rise to within 100 feet of the ocean surface, ensuring a rich habitat for undersea creatures due to the high concentration of particulates in the water and the nearness of sunlight.

Unfortunately, cold water corals grow slowly and are very susceptible to the effects of trawling, which is why Fishery Management Councils along the east coast have begun to take action to protect areas like canyons and seamounts with rich deep-sea coral populations.

New England’s corals are surrounded by towering kelp forests, fish and mammals of all kinds, and even sea turtles. So if you’ve ever wanted to dive the Great Barrier Reef, but balked at the idea of that plane ticket to Australia, consider exploring the underwater scenery right in our own backyard!

Scalloped hammerhead sharks. Image via Daniel Kwok, Flickr.
Scalloped hammerhead sharks. Image via Daniel Kwok, Flickr.
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Protecting Sharks

It’s been a good summer for shark conservation. On July 24th, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick signed a bill banning the possession and sale of shark fins in the state. While the 2010 Shark Conservation Act passed by Congress had prohibited shark finning and required sharks harvested in state waters to be brought to shore whole, it did not eliminate the market for imported shark fins in the U.S., where shark fin soup is sometimes priced at $100. With Massachusetts’ ban in place, a total of nine U.S. states and three U.S. territories have now joined in efforts to eliminate finning altogether.

Last month, scalloped hammerheads made national news when the species became the first shark to be placed on the U.S. Endangered Species List. The scalloped hammerhead is threatened by the commercial fishery for its fins—the sharks are highly valued in the fin trade because of their fin size and high fin ray count. They are also caught as bycatch by offshore longlines and gillnets.

This shark is found in warm and temperate waters across the globe; four scalloped hammerhead shark populations were placed on the endangered species list. The Eastern Atlantic and Eastern Pacific scalloped hammerheads were listed as “endangered,” and the Central & Southwest Atlantic and Indo-West Pacific scalloped hammerheads were listed as “threatened.” This listing prohibits the catch, sale, and trade of scalloped hammerheads in the United States.

These actions are a win for shark conservation, and they build on other state and federal protections for the approximately 400 shark species in the world, about 40 of which are found in U.S. waters. In New England, there are at least 26 shark species protected by state catch limits, size minimums, types of equipment permitted for use or a prohibition against their harvest. Some of the popularly-known protected sharks that cannot be harvested in New England include the great white (Carcharodon carcharia), basking (Cetorhinus maximus), longfin mako (Isurus paucus), and sand tiger shark (Carcharias Taurus).

Why protect the feared kings of the sea? Well, first of all, they’re just cool, and as this video shows, they’re not as dangerous as most people think.

Sharks also play a critical ecological role as the ocean’s apex predators.

Unfortunately, sharks take a relatively long time to grow to maturity, produce few offspring, depend on wide swaths of intact ocean habitat, and are very sensitive to ecosystem changes.  All of that means they’re exremely vulnerable to the effects of overfishing and habitat loss. Nearly half of the shark and ray species assessed by scientists for the International Union for Conservation of Nature are threatened or near-threatened with extinction, and around 100 million sharks are killed every year in commercial fisheries.

So while there have been some steps in the right direction, there’s still plenty more we can do to protect these great ocean fish, from research to habitat protection to improved fisheries management and bycatch reduction. The health of our marine ecosystems depends on it.

A great white shark circles gray seals off Chatham, MA. Photo via Mass. Office of Energy and Environment
A great white shark circles gray seals off Chatham, MA. Photo via Mass. Office of Energy and Environment
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The Ocean’s Top Predators

In “Ocean Soul,” world-renowned National Geographic photographer Brian Skerry says, “It’s been said that sharks have remained unchanged for hundreds of millions of years because they are perfect and that no further evolutionary change is necessary.”

Sharks have certainly reached the top of the food chain as the ocean’s apex predators. Apex is a word of Latin origin meaning peak or tip. In ecological terms, apex is used to describe an animal that has no natural predator within its ecosystem—terrestrial examples include wolves and cougars.

Although humans might find them terrifying, apex predators are crucial for maintaining healthy ecosystems. Sharks, for example, play a vital role in balancing ocean food webs. They aid in population control of smaller predators, so that prey species are able to exist at healthy levels. They also regulate the behavior and abundance of prey species, protecting habitat like seagrass beds and coral reefs from overgrazing, and promote biodiversity by preventing any single prey species from monopolizing resources.

Sharks also tend to prey on weak or sick members of a species, so as to minimize their caloric hunting expense. This natural tendency towards efficiency promotes healthier populations by advancing the transmission of strong genes, as weaker genes are taken out of the gene pool.

Despite the enormous amount of good we know sharks do for ocean ecosystems, humans hunt sharks for their meat, especially their fins. Sharks can also become collateral damage to commercial fishing for other species—accidental net entanglements or hooking often prove lethal. According to a 2013 report published in “Marine Policy,” humans killed approximately 100 million sharks in 2000, and 97 million in 2010. Annually, humans kill between 63 and 273 million sharks.

What happens when the oceans begin to feel the loss of sharks? Populations of smaller predator species boom, stressing habitats and depleting populations of prey species. These changes can be very detrimental to the fishing industry. For example, depleted great white shark populations have been linked to the boom in gray seal numbers in New England, and the voracious appetite of the seals may be harming the recovery of overfished cod. In North Carolina, a decline in large sharks because of overfishing led to an increase in cownose rays, one of the sharks’ prey species. Cownose rays eat shellfish, and so an increase in their population caused the bay scallop fishery to collapse.

Clearly, apex predators like sharks are absolutely critical to maintaining healthy marine ecosystems. The role of apex predators is better understood today than ever before, and now that we know how vital their role is, it is time to protect and respect the ocean’s top predators.

A great white swims in a Cape Cod salt pond in 2004. Image via Mass EEA
A great white swims in a Cape Cod salt pond in 2004. Image via Mass EEA
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Gearing Up for Shark Week

The Discovery Channel’s Shark Week starts in just ten days! As ocean fans around the world gear up for the annual celebration of all things shark, New Englanders are turning their eyes to the North Atlantic Great white population. It seems these days Cape Cod beachgoers can’t help but scan the ocean horizon for a dorsal fin before taking a chilly but refreshing dip.

This year’s Cape Cod shark-spotting season kicked off on June 23rd when Captain Tyler Macallister captured video footage of a great white, Carchardon carcharias, six miles southwest of Provincetown, in Cape Cod Bay. Upon seeing the shark, Macallister began recording his calm and somewhat mystical encounter with the estimated 16-to-18 foot great white. A Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries biologist confirmed that the fish captured on Macallister’s video camera was a great white, but that the lack of scale in the footage meant its size could not be accurately determined.

Five days after Captain Macallister’s encounter with a great white shark in Cape Cod Bay, researchers from the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy saw a great white one-quarter of a mile off of Nauset Beach, near Orleans, Cape Cod. The researchers were able to identify the fish as a 12-to-14 feet long female great white and named her “Ping.” Ping was first spotted by a spotter plane and then tracked by boat. The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy sends out both a spotter plane and boat twice a week to study Ping and other great whites.

The increase in great white shark sightings has been going on for the last decade or so, and in the Cape Cod area it’s been partially attributed to the growing gray seal, Halichoerus grypus, population around the Cape. Gray seals were previously hunted by fishermen as a precaution towards preserving fish populations that the Gray seals consume, but the seals are presently protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. Great white sharks prey on seals and as seal populations expand in the Cape Cod area, there appears to be a growing number of white sharks.

If you are curious where these sharks spend their days, when they are not busy stalking Cape Cod’s massive seal populations, you can track tagged sharks through Ocearch.com or through the Ocearch app. And get ready for more information on New England’s sharks as we celebrate Shark Week here at New England Ocean Odyssey!