Brian Skerry photographs farm-raised carp going to market in Wujin China while on assignment for National Geographic.
Brian Skerry photographs farm-raised carp going to market in Wujin China while on assignment for National Geographic.

Brian Skerry Joins Us at the Boston Sea Rovers’ Dive Show and You Should Too!

We are so excited to be at the Boston Sea Rovers’ dive show again this year as an exhibitor, and are thrilled to announce that we will be hosting a panel discussion on Saturday, March 8th with world-renowned underwater photographer and Sea Rover Brian Skerry, eminent marine scientist and Professor of Biology at Boston University Les Kaufman, and Conservation Law Foundation’s VP and Ocean Program Director Priscilla Brooks!

Details:

  • The Boston Sea Rovers’ show is March 7th – 9th at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel in Danvers, MA. All the information you need to register and attend is on the Sea Rovers’ website.
  • Our presentation and panel discussion will be on Saturday, March 8th at 2 pm. The location within the hotel will be announced at the day of the presentation.

 

Brian Skerry will be showing his awe-inspiring photographs of Cashes Ledge – a New England undersea treasure in need of protection. Skerry and CLF are working to document and protect this special place. Come hear why Skerry says diving on Cashes Ledge is every bit as thrilling, surprising, and beautiful as anywhere else he’s been. He will give a short talk, featuring his original photography, about what he’s seen in the kelp forest on Cashes Ledge and why he is motivated to help keep it thriving. After the talk, there will be a panel discussion with Skerry, Witman, and Brooks.

We will also have a booth in the exhibit hall where you can come by and chat, learn more about Cashes Ledge, and help us with our work to protect this special place. We hope to see you there!

Originally published on February 6th.

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World Premiere of Ocean Frontiers II – A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea

How do we meet our ever-expanding demands on the ocean and also work together to protect it? The answer is explored in a new film from Green Fire Productions, Ocean Frontiers II: A New England Story for Sustaining the Sea. The second in the award-winning film series, Ocean Frontiers II is an inspiring story of citizens working together for the sake of the sea. Please join us for the premieres of this timely and important film in Providence on October 28th and in Boston on October 29th.

Ocean Frontiers II brings you face to face with those now embarking on the nation’s first regional ocean plan, promoting healthier economies and healthier seas across New England. A spotlight on Rhode Island reveals how the Ocean State turned potential conflict into collaboration, inviting all on a path of ocean stewardship. Watch the film trailer here http://ocean-frontiers.org/trailer.

The world premiere of Ocean Frontiers II is in Rhode Island on October 28th, at 7pm at the Providence Public Library. The Massachusetts premiere is the following night, October 29th, at the New England Aquarium’s IMAX theater in Boston, also at 7pm. Both events are free and open to the public, but space is limited so please make your reservation:

 

Providence, October 28th http://bit.ly/OceanFrontiers2RI

Boston, October 29th http://bit.ly/OceanFrontiers2Boston

 

Following the screening of each film we will have a short panel discussion that explores New England’s leadership to foster sustainable growth of our ocean economy and the protection and restoration of our ocean ecosystems.

You may have seen the original Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship, at one of our previous screeningsOcean Frontiers is a compelling voyage to seaports and watersheds across the country to meet industrial shippers and whale biologists, pig farmers and wetland ecologists, commercial and sport fishermen and reef snorkelers—all of them embarking on a new course of cooperation to sustain the sea and our coastal and ocean economies.

Following on the heels of the award-winning Ocean Frontiers I, Green Fire Productions brings you face to face with those now embarking on the nation’s first multi-state attempt at ocean planning. Navy scientists, wind-energy executives, fishermen, Native American tribal leaders, planners and environmental advocates – all are working as one to promote healthier economies and a healthier ocean across the breadth of New England.

According to Karen Meyer, Executive Director of Green Fire Productions, “One of our goals was to make sure that people know that ocean planning is underway and that all of our voices are really critical at this stage. It’s our role as concerned citizens who are interested in coastal economies and a thriving marine ecosystem to be involved and make our voices heard.”

Please join us at one of these premieres and learn how to make your voice heard in ocean planning. In the meantime, learn more about why ocean planning matters in New England. We hope to see you at the movies!

Longfin squid in the Gulf of Maine. One of many amazing Skerry images featured at Ocean Awareness Week.
Longfin squid in the Gulf of Maine. One of many amazing Skerry images featured at Ocean Awareness Week.
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Mark Your Calendars: Ocean Awareness Week is Coming to NH’s Seacoast!

Here at Conservation Law Foundation, we would like every week to be Ocean Awareness Week. So, when our friends at the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, New Hampshire and The Music Hall in Portsmouth told us that they were planning a week of local activities and events dedicated to everything ocean this October, we were all over it. CLF is very proud to sponsor the first annual Ocean Awareness Week, alongside The Music Hall, the Seacoast Science Center, Gundalow Company and Kent Stephens’ Stage Force.

Ocean Awareness Week aims to bring attention to the importance of healthy oceans with a particular focus on the Gulf of Maine and the role of arts and culture in promoting sustainability. CLF has long been a leader in protecting the Gulf of Maine and its coastal treasures like the Great Bay estuary. CLF’s New England Ocean Odyssey campaign, which aims to engage New Englanders in caring for their oceans and coasts through photography, is a perfect fit with Ocean Awareness Week’s focus on art to promote ocean and coastal awareness.

Ocean Awareness Week kicks off at the Seacoast Science Center on Sunday, October 6 with two screenings of the film, Ocean Frontiers at 11 AM and 2PM. Produced by Karen Meyers, Ocean Frontiers shows how the many users of the ocean, from fishermen to shippers to farmers, are solving challenging problems affecting our busy oceans by working together. The film tells fascinating stories of the innovative solutions that these stakeholders have created out of shared concern for the future of one of our most precious of natural resources. Following each screening, Seacoast Science Center President, Wendy Lull, and CLF’s Director of Ocean Conservation, Dr. Priscilla Brooks, will host a question and answer session for attendees.

Meanwhile, Seacoast Science Center visitors can get a close up look at the amazing wildlife that lives in New England’s ocean through the lens of renowned underwater photographer, Brian Skerry. Skerry, a New England native whose arresting photographs have graced the pages (and many covers!) of National Geographic magazine, has partnered with CLF to bring attention to the mysteries of New England’s ocean through the New England Ocean Odyssey. For the first time at the Center, Skerry’s exclusive photographs for CLF will be displayed together, revealing surprising facets of ocean life that cement our bond with these remote creatures and reinforce our will to protect their home.

Skerry’s photos will be displayed alongside the work of several other local photographers who love diving in New England’s ocean and sharing what they see in her murky depths. The works chosen for the exhibit are winners of New England Ocean Odyssey’s monthly photo contest, which Skerry helps to judge. The New England Ocean Odyssey photo exhibit will run through December. Visitors to the Center can pick up free postcards of Skerry’s photographs and other CLF literature.

Later in the week, CLF will take more of Skerry’s photos on the road to several Ocean Awareness Week events. Our traveling team of New England ocean and coastal experts will be on hand to talk about CLF’s work and answer questions at the following events and locations:

  • Wednesday, October 9 from 4:30-6:30 PM, Gundalow Company VIP Boat Cruise

The Dock at Prescott Park, at the end of Water Street, Portsmouth

CLF’s new Great-Bay Piscataqua Waterkeeper, Jeff Barnum, will be a featured speaker on this educational outing aboard the Piscataqua about the Gulf of Maine and our marine ecosystem. The cruise is free for VIP Reception Ticket holders. Space is limited. For reservations call Gundalow Company at 603-433-9505.

  • Saturday, October 12 at The Music Hall Historic Theater

4PM: Nationally recognized storyteller Jay O’Callahan performs the story of Richard Wheeler’s epic kayak journey tracing the path of the now extinct sea bird, The Great Auk.

5PM: Portsmouth Ocean Prize ceremony honoring Richard Wheeler

6:15 PM: VIP reception at The Loft at the Music Hall

Open to VIP seating and reception ticket holders.

Tickets to all Music Hall events may be purchased online at The Music Hall website. Prices vary. View the full itinerary of events and pricing.

Our Ocean Awareness Week team includes, in addition to Dr. Brooks:

Tom Irwin, Director of CLF New Hampshire, Robin Just, Ocean Communications Associate, Leah Fine, Ocean Program Assistant, Jeff Barnum, CLF’s Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper.

We hope you’ll come visit with us as you enjoy Ocean Awareness Week!

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Ocean Art at its Finest – The Smithsonian Brings It

Categories: Events/Calendar

Soul-enriching opportunity alert! Two very beautiful, very different new exhibits are going on display next week at my favorite Hall of Wonders – the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

Starting Tuesday, September 17th, twenty of Brian Skerry’s most breathtaking and thought-provoking photographs will be featured in a “Portraits of Planet Ocean” exhibit on the 1st floor of Sant Ocean Hall.

Skerry said this about the upcoming exhibit, “I am deeply honored to have an exhibit of my work at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. This creatively designed show will bring visitors into the sea for an intimate look at marine wildlife while highlighting environmental threats and the value of conservation. The show gives a fresh, new perspective to the photographs and I am excited about continuing to reach new audiences about the magnificence of the sea!”

Earlier this year, the Smithsonian asked people to vote for the Skerry image that best represents a “Vanishing World” theme for the display, and the winners have been chosen. I’m happy to see that some “charismatic microfauna” made the cut, in addition to the very compelling seal, manatee, and whale photographs.

Speaking of charismatic microfauna, both Skerry and fine artist Corneila Kubler Kavanagh will be featured in “Fragile Beauty: The Art & Science of Sea Butterflies,” also in the Sant Ocean Hall.

Kavanagh has brought the tiny sea butterfly into our visible world with her soaring, elegant sculptures. She has been collaborating with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ocean acidification researcher Gareth Lawson to capture the movement and importance of these imperiled animals, who are showing signs of extreme stress as our seas rapidly change.

Pteropods, planktonic animals including the sea butterflies and their arch-nemesis the sea angels, are some of the most essential prey items in the ocean. As our guest plankton reporter Casey Deiderich said last week, “If the phytoplankton are at the base of the food chain, then the zooplankton are at the first rung.”

Hopefully, this special show can help people understand what is at stake so we can find the political will to dial up our national efforts to combat climate change. Not only that, but if you don’t have a boat and a microscope you may never get to see a pteropod in person, so don’t miss this opportunity to gaze upon their ethereal beauty in these two exhibits.

As if this all wasn’t enough reason to make haste to the Smithsonian, did you know they have two giant squid there? My family had to drag me away when we visited a few years ago. I could have poked around the ocean exhibits for days. And there was only one giant squid then.

We are heading to DC again next month and good luck getting me out of the Ocean Hall this time, because in addition to 100% more giant squid, there is now a high concentration of beautiful ocean art to be lingered over. My kids can head to the Air and Space Museum without me.

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Shark diving – taking a bite out of Jaws

Just a few years ago only adrenaline junkies or daring visionaries would have thought of jumping in the water to dive near sharks. Today, it is a whole different story. Many divers and snorkelers hope to see sharks of all sizes, some of which were once considered man-eaters. These often greatly misunderstood creatures are now attracting divers who simply want to observe them and get a glimpse of their universe. As with any wildlife encounter it’s important to be responsible when diving near sharks. Use only well known dive operators that will teach you how to safely and respectfully interact with sharks and other ocean life.

While sharks have long been perceived by many as voracious killers, for me they have become a fascination. I have traveled around the globe for the pleasure of diving with them. I have been in places like Cocos Island in Costa Rica and the remote islands of Wolfe and Darwin in the Galapagos.

These are expensive destinations but I and many other divers think it’s worth it. The reason is simple: they remain two of the best places in the world to dive with scalloped hammerhead sharks who congregate there by the thousands. There are so many other examples of how shark diving is making a positive contribution to our tourist economies:

  • On a shark diving trip to the Maldives, a small island nation located in the middle of the Indian Ocean, I was thrilled to see a billboard advertising shark ecotourism, but not in the usual way. The ad showed various parts of a shark that can be sold – each with a price tag. But there was another price tag showing that this same shark could generate far more in shark tourism if left alive than the shark parts would ever bring in.

 

  • In New England, in places like Maine and Rhode Island, operators offer day trips to snorkel or dive with blue and mako sharks. Anyone can participate – if you’re not a certified diver, you can still snorkel. Blue sharks used to be one of the most abundant species on the planet. Sadly, they have dramatically suffered from finning, overfishing and bycatch.

 

 

  • Going north of Maine, in Quebec (Canada), you can dive with a prehistoric looking animal: the Greenland shark (below). I have dived with this animal on several occasions and it is always a very unique experience. This shark moves slowly to conserve its energy and if you are lucky enough, it will let you swim by while it remains nearly motionless. Blue sharks and porbeagle sharks can be seen in Quebec as well.

Greenland shark

Interacting with sharks is an incredible experience, and it makes you realize that they are very different from how they are portrayed in the movies. It is so humbling to look at the graceful movement of a shark passing by. Shark conservationists and scientists have played an important role in changing the way we look at sharks and the Jaws aura surrounding sharks is slowly fading. Fear of sharks is being transformed into respect and curiosity, and an increasing number of people are coming down with what ails me: shark fever!

Today’s guest post is by our friend Michel Labrecque. Michel is a published underwater photographer and contributor for various underwater medias. He is also a PADI Master Instructor, IANTD Trimix Instructor, a DAN and EFR Instructor Trainer and an HSA Instructor. He co-owns Plongée XL, a PADI 5 Star IDC Dive Center located in Victoriaville, Canada with Julie Ouimet who signs most of their articles.